6th Grade


8.) Understand that positive and negative numbers are used together to describe quantities having opposite directions or values (e.g., temperature above/below zero, elevation above/below sea level, credits/debits, positive/negative electric charge); use positive and negative numbers to represent quantities in real-world contexts explaining the meaning of 0 in each situation. [6-NS5]

20.) Use variables to represent two quantities in a real-world problem that change in relationship to one another; write an equation to express one quantity, thought of as the dependent variable, in terms of the other quantity, thought of as the independent variable. Analyze the relationship between the dependent and independent variables using graphs and tables, and relate these to the equation. Example: In a problem involving motion at constant speed, list and graph ordered pairs of distances and times, and write the equation d = 65t to represent the relationship between distance and time. [6-EE9]

21.) Find the area of right triangles, other triangles, special quadrilaterals, and polygons by composing into rectangles or decomposing into triangles and other shapes; apply these techniques in the context of solving real-world and mathematical problems. [6-G1]

23.) Draw polygons in the coordinate plane given coordinates for the vertices; use coordinates to find the length of a side joining points with the same first coordinate or the same second coordinate. Apply these techniques in the context of solving real-world and mathematical problems. [6-G3]

24.) Represent three-dimensional figures using nets made up of rectangles and triangles, and use the nets to find the surface area of these figures. Apply these techniques in the context of solving real-world and mathematical problems. [6-G4]


7th Grade


2.) Recognize and represent proportional relationships between quantities. [7-RP2]
d. Explain what a point (x, y) on the graph of a proportional relationship means in terms of the situation, with special attention to the points (0, 0) and (1, r) where r is the unit rate. [7-RP2d]

12.) Draw (freehand, with ruler and protractor, and with technology) geometric shapes with given conditions. Focus on constructing triangles from three measures of angles or sides, noticing when the conditions determine a unique triangle, more than one triangle, or no triangle. [7-G2]


14.) Know the formulas for the area and circumference of a circle, and use them to solve problems; give an informal derivation of the relationship between the circumference and area of a circle. [7-G4]


15.) Use facts about supplementary, complementary, vertical, and adjacent angles in a multistep problem to write and solve simple equations for an unknown angle in a figure. [7-G5]

8th Grade


10.) Analyze and solve pairs of simultaneous linear equations. [8-EE8]

a. Understand that solutions to a system of two linear equations in two variables correspond to points of intersections of their graphs because points of intersection satisfy both equations simultaneously. [8-EE8a]

b. Solve systems of two linear equations in two variables algebraically, and estimate solutions by graphing the equations. Solve simple cases by inspection. [8-EE8b]

Example: 3x + 2y = 5 and 3x + 2y = 6 have no solution because 3x + 2y cannot simultaneously be 5 and 6.

c. Solve real-world and mathematical problems leading to two linear equations in two variables. [8-EE8c]

Example: Given coordinates for two pairs of points, determine whether the line through the first pair of points intersects the line through the second pair.


12.) Compare properties of two functions, each represented in a different way (algebraically, graphically, numerically in tables, or by verbal descriptions). [8-F2]

Example: Given a linear function represented by a table of values and linear function represented by an algebraic expression, determine which function has the greater rate of change.


16.) Verify experimentally the properties of rotations, reflections, and translations: [8-G1]

a. Lines are taken to lines, and line segments are taken to line segments of the same length. [8-G1a]

b. Angles are taken to angles of the same measure. [8-G1b]

c. Parallel lines are taken to parallel lines. [8-G1c]


18.) Describe the effect of dilations, translations, rotations, and reflections on two-dimensional figures using coordinates. [8-G3]


21.) Explain a proof of the Pythagorean Theorem and its converse. [8-G6]

Algebra I


22.) Explain why the x-coordinates of the points where the graphs of the equations y = f(x) and y = g(x) intersect are the solutions of the equation f(x) = g(x); find the solutions approximately, e.g., using technology to graph the functions, make tables of values, or find successive approximations. Include cases where f(x) and/or g(x) are linear, polynomial, rational, absolute value, exponential, and logarithmic functions.* [A-REI11]


30.) Graph functions expressed symbolically and show key features of the graph, by hand in simple cases and using technology for more complicated cases.* [F-IF7]

a. Graph linear and quadratic functions, and show intercepts, maxima, and minima. [F-IF7a]

b. Graph square root, cube root, and piecewise-defined functions, including step functions and absolute value functions. [F-IF7b]

c. Graph exponential and logarithmic functions, showing intercepts and end behavior, and trigonometric functions, showing period, midline, and amplitude. [F-IF7e]

35.) Identify the effect on the graph of replacing f(x) by f(x) + k, k f(x), f(kx), and f(x + k) for specific values of k (both positive and negative); find the value of k given the graphs. Experiment with cases and illustrate an explanation of the effects on the graph using technology. Include recognizing even and odd functions from their graphs and algebraic expressions for them. [F-BF3]
47.) Compute (using technology) and interpret the correlation coefficient of a linear fit. [S-ID8]

Geometry


2.) Represent transformations in the plane using, e.g., transparencies and geometry software; describe transformations as functions that take points in the plane as inputs and give other points as outputs. Compare transformations that preserve distance and angle to those that do not (e.g., translation versus horizontal stretch). [G-CO2]


5.) Given a geometric figure and a rotation, reflection, or translation, draw the transformed figure using, e.g., graph paper, tracing paper, or geometry software. Specify a sequence of transformations that will carry a given figure onto another. [G-CO5]


12.) Make formal geometric constructions with a variety of tools and methods such as compass and straightedge, string, reflective devices, paper folding, and dynamic geometric software. Constructions include copying a segment; copying an angle; bisecting a segment; bisecting an angle; constructing perpendicular lines, including the perpendicular bisector of a line segment; and constructing a line parallel to a given line through a point not on the line. [G-CO12]


Algebra II (with and without Trigonometry)


21.) Explain why the x-coordinates of the points where the graphs of the equations y = f(x) and y = g(x) intersect are the solutions of the equation f(x) = g(x); find the solutions approximately, e.g., using technology to graph the functions, make tables of values, or find successive approximations. Include cases where f(x) and/or g(x) are linear, polynomial, rational, absolute value, exponential, and logarithmic functions.* [A-REI11]

25.) Graph functions expressed symbolically, and show key features of the graph, by hand in simple cases and using technology for more complicated cases.* [F-IF7]

a. Graph square root, cube root, and piecewise-defined functions, including step functions and absolute value functions. [F-IF7b]

b. Graph polynomial functions, identifying zeros when suitable factorizations are available, and showing end behavior. [F-IF7c]

c. Graph exponential and logarithmic functions, showing intercepts and end behavior, and trigonometric functions, showing period, midline, and amplitude. [F-IF7]


29.) Identify the effect on the graph of replacing f(x) by f(x) + k, k f(x), f(kx), and f(x + k) for specific values of k (both positive and negative); find the value of k given the graphs. Experiment with cases and illustrate an explanation of the effects on the graph using technology. Include recognizing even and odd functions from their graphs and algebraic expressions for them. [F-BF3]

31.) For exponential models, express as a logarithm the solution to abct = d where a, c, and d are numbers, and the base b is 2, 10, or e; evaluate the logarithm using technology. [F-LE4]

Precalculus

19.) (+) Find the inverse of a matrix if it exists and use it to solve systems of linear equations (using technology for matrices of dimension 3 x 3 or greater). [A-REI9]

35.) (+) Use inverse functions to solve trigonometric equations that arise in modeling contexts; evaluate the solutions using technology, and interpret them in terms of the context.* [F-TF7]